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The Last Thing I Told You

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I hear myself whispering. Not again. Not again. Why did I ever come back here? Surely because of you. Because I thought of something I'd always meant to tell you. Because you were the only one I ever really wanted to tell it to. Therapist Dr. Mark Fabian is dead, bludgeoned in his office. But that doesn't stop former patient Nadine Raines from talking to him -- in her head. I hear myself whispering. Not again. Not again. Why did I ever come back here? Surely because of you. Because I thought of something I'd always meant to tell you. Because you were the only one I ever really wanted to tell it to. Therapist Dr. Mark Fabian is dead, bludgeoned in his office. But that doesn't stop former patient Nadine Raines from talking to him -- in her head. Why did she come back to her hometown after so many years away? Everyone here thinks she's crazy. And she has to admit, they might have good reason to think so. She committed a shockingly violent act when she was sixteen and has never really been able to explain that dark impulse, even to Fabian. Now that Fabian's dead, why is she still trying? Meanwhile, as Detective Henry Peacher investigates Fabian's death, he discovers that shortly before he died, Fabian pulled the files of two former patients. One was of Nadine Raines, one of Henry's former high school classmates. Henry still remembers the disturbing attack on a teacher that marked Nadine as a deeply troubled teen. More shockingly, the other file was of Johnny Streeter, who is now serving a life sentence for a mass shooting five years ago. The shooting devastated the town and everyone -- including Henry who is uncomfortable with the "hero" status the tragedy afforded him -- is ready to move on. But the appearance of his file brings up new questions. Maybe there is a decades-old connection between Nadine and Streeter. And maybe that somehow explains what Nadine is doing in Fabian's office nearly twenty years after being his patient. Or how Fabian ended up dead two days after her return. Or why Nadine has fled town once again. But as Nadine and Henry head toward a confrontation, both will discover that the secrets of people's hearts are rarely simple, and even in the hidden depths of a psychologist's files, rarely as they appear.


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I hear myself whispering. Not again. Not again. Why did I ever come back here? Surely because of you. Because I thought of something I'd always meant to tell you. Because you were the only one I ever really wanted to tell it to. Therapist Dr. Mark Fabian is dead, bludgeoned in his office. But that doesn't stop former patient Nadine Raines from talking to him -- in her head. I hear myself whispering. Not again. Not again. Why did I ever come back here? Surely because of you. Because I thought of something I'd always meant to tell you. Because you were the only one I ever really wanted to tell it to. Therapist Dr. Mark Fabian is dead, bludgeoned in his office. But that doesn't stop former patient Nadine Raines from talking to him -- in her head. Why did she come back to her hometown after so many years away? Everyone here thinks she's crazy. And she has to admit, they might have good reason to think so. She committed a shockingly violent act when she was sixteen and has never really been able to explain that dark impulse, even to Fabian. Now that Fabian's dead, why is she still trying? Meanwhile, as Detective Henry Peacher investigates Fabian's death, he discovers that shortly before he died, Fabian pulled the files of two former patients. One was of Nadine Raines, one of Henry's former high school classmates. Henry still remembers the disturbing attack on a teacher that marked Nadine as a deeply troubled teen. More shockingly, the other file was of Johnny Streeter, who is now serving a life sentence for a mass shooting five years ago. The shooting devastated the town and everyone -- including Henry who is uncomfortable with the "hero" status the tragedy afforded him -- is ready to move on. But the appearance of his file brings up new questions. Maybe there is a decades-old connection between Nadine and Streeter. And maybe that somehow explains what Nadine is doing in Fabian's office nearly twenty years after being his patient. Or how Fabian ended up dead two days after her return. Or why Nadine has fled town once again. But as Nadine and Henry head toward a confrontation, both will discover that the secrets of people's hearts are rarely simple, and even in the hidden depths of a psychologist's files, rarely as they appear.

30 review for The Last Thing I Told You

  1. 4 out of 5

    Holly B

    An interesting premise and opening chapter. A psychiatrist  is found murdered in his office. "This is you. This is real. This is what you've done." What we don't know is whose words these are or why they did this. Nadine Raines is a former patient of Dr. Fabian and she is back in town after many years of being away.  She has a dark past and committed a violent act when she was only sixteen.  This is why she was a therapy patient of Dr Fabian (whom she refers to as "Bouffant")  Sgt. Henry Peacher An interesting premise and opening chapter. A psychiatrist  is found murdered in his office. "This is you. This is real. This is what you've done." What we don't know is whose words these are or why they did this. Nadine Raines is a former patient of Dr. Fabian and she is back in town after many years of being away.  She has a dark past and committed a violent act when she was only sixteen.  This is why she was a therapy patient of Dr Fabian (whom she refers to as "Bouffant")  Sgt. Henry Peacher remembers Nadine from their high school years and he is assigned the case.   We get both Nadine's and Henry's POV in alternating chapters.  Nadine also addresses Dr. Fabian through her internal monologue and this was interesting to hear her thoughts about this psychiatrist and try to guess if she had a motive. There are more twists (one quite shocking), but the story unfolded a bit slow for me.  In the end, it was a pretty typical police procedural with a couple of twists that kept me guessing.  Fans of the genre will enjoy trying to solve the case.  In the end, I must say I was a bit underwhelmed. Thanks to the publisher for my copy to read and review.

  2. 3 out of 5

    Linda Strong

    Psychiatrist Dr. Mark Fabian is dead—bludgeoned in his office. Detective Henry Peacher investigates Fabian's death and finds that shortly before his death, he pulled the files of 2 former patients. One file is of Johnny Streeter, a man now serving a life sentence for a mass shooting. Ironically, Peacher is the cop who shot him before he could kill anyone else. The other file is of Nadine Raines. Again, there's a link between her and Peacher ... he was in the same classroom when she attacked the t Psychiatrist Dr. Mark Fabian is dead—bludgeoned in his office. Detective Henry Peacher investigates Fabian's death and finds that shortly before his death, he pulled the files of 2 former patients. One file is of Johnny Streeter, a man now serving a life sentence for a mass shooting. Ironically, Peacher is the cop who shot him before he could kill anyone else. The other file is of Nadine Raines. Again, there's a link between her and Peacher ... he was in the same classroom when she attacked the teacher with a box cutter. She's been gone many years ..so why has she come back now? And why would these files be pulled when neither of them had been patients for 20 years? As Nadine and Henry head toward a confrontation, both will discover that the secrets of people’s hearts are rarely simple, and—even in the hidden depths of a psychologist’s files—rarely as they appear. This is an amazing psychological thriller. The story kept me glued to the pages anxiously awaiting what would come next. This thread attaches to that thread that affixes itself to yet another thread. I love how this book is cleverly written. Alternating chapters are told in turn by Nadine and Peacher. Nadine is still talking to the doctor in her head ... but did she kill him? There were things she never told him ... Peacher tells the story of how he got to be the hero-cop, a moniker he doesn't really like. His personal life is also talked about .. mainly about his twin daughters. It's a police procedural in how investigations should be run and how the clues start coming together with a lot of door-knocking and asking the right questions. All in all, a terrific book that kept me guessing until the very end. Many thanks to the author / William Morrow Books / Edelweiss for the advanced copy of this psychological thriller. Opinions expressed here are unbiased and entirely my own.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dennis

    Dr. Mark Fabian is dead. Dr. Fabian is a psychologist and therapist, specializing with clients who suffer from mental and personality disorders. He was dedicated to his service and clientele, with their privacy at the utmost respect. Who would want to kill him—especially in his own office? One of his patients, Nadine Raines, suffers from multiple personality and mental disorders, due to a difficult childhood, and genetic predisposition. Nadine copes with her life while speaking to the voices in Dr. Mark Fabian is dead. Dr. Fabian is a psychologist and therapist, specializing with clients who suffer from mental and personality disorders. He was dedicated to his service and clientele, with their privacy at the utmost respect. Who would want to kill him—especially in his own office? One of his patients, Nadine Raines, suffers from multiple personality and mental disorders, due to a difficult childhood, and genetic predisposition. Nadine copes with her life while speaking to the voices in her head, one of them being Dr. Fabian. Dr. Fabian has been a constant advocate in her life. Growing up, Nadine committed a violent act in school against a teacher, unknowingly acting upon her mental illness, but she never understood why. Dr. Fabian was so dedicated to his work, and tried to help Nadine and his other patients, but ultimately was deceived and murdered. Who wants Dr. Fabian dead, and why? What did he know? I can't go too much more into this story, in fact I think that the synopsis on Goodreads tells too much of the story. One major aspect of The Last Thing I Told You that I really enjoyed is that it's perfect for readers who are intrigued by the societal stigmas towards people with mental disabilities. It puts a spotlight on these disabilities and humanizes them. It's a great read for those who are curious about people who are different and who are shunned by society. While the pacing of The Last Thing I Told You starts off strong and fast, the build up burns out just as quickly and the story starts to get repetitive. I felt that chapters started meshing together and the story started going around in circles, for what felt like an eternity. As the story progresses and kept repeating the previous chapter's moments and messages, the mystery started to fade. Although it's definitely a psychological thriller, The Last Thing I Told You is not a mystery for those who love the genre. Overall, The Last Thing I Told You is very atmospheric and gripping from a psychological standpoint, but it falls into the category as forgettable for me. It's not a bad book by any means, just not one that will stand out for me in the future. If you are new to the psychological thriller genre and are curious about novels dealing with people who suffer from mental illness, I encourage you to pick this story up. It might change your opinion about the stigma with mental health. Thank you William Morrow Books for my advanced copy in exchange for an honest review. The Last Thing I Told You will be released on July 24, 2018.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kristy

    Dr. Mark Fabian is dead--found murdered in his office. Left behind is his former patient, Nadine, who continues to talk to Dr. Fabian in her mind, telling him about her life in the many years since she saw the doctor. Back then, she was a troubled teen, ostracized for a gruesome act while in high school. Investigating Dr. Fabian's murder is Henry Peacher, a detective most known in town for stopping a deadly shooting at a posh retirement community before the death count went any higher. Before Dr Dr. Mark Fabian is dead--found murdered in his office. Left behind is his former patient, Nadine, who continues to talk to Dr. Fabian in her mind, telling him about her life in the many years since she saw the doctor. Back then, she was a troubled teen, ostracized for a gruesome act while in high school. Investigating Dr. Fabian's murder is Henry Peacher, a detective most known in town for stopping a deadly shooting at a posh retirement community before the death count went any higher. Before Dr. Fabian died, he pulled two files from his archives: those of Nadine's and Johnny Streeter, the man responsible for the killing at the retirement home. Henry is left to puzzle through what this all means--for instance, what did Nadine and Dr. Fabian discuss when she returned to town a mere two days before his death? Is there a connection between Nadine and Johnny? And what led to the brutal killing of this doctor? Well, this was a different sort of psychological thriller. It wasn't quite what I was expecting, but one of my favorite things about it was that it was different, even if it favored the varying point-of-view aspect that is quite popular these days. The narration flips between Nadine and Henry, and because both are often telling stories that go back in time, it can vary in time periods as well. It takes a little getting used to, but it's also quite compelling. I read the book in a day while on vacation, finding it to be quite suspenseful and intriguing. For me, the main draw to this one was the characters. Nadine is nuanced, complicated, and imperfect, but the real star was Henry. I enjoyed the book the most due to him. He's hard to describe, but he too is multi-faceted and flawed. He's a father to spirited twin girls (only a year older than mine), and I felt drawn to him immediately. Nadine and Henry are both different on the surface but each searching for things in a similar way--again, I was very impressed with their characterization. So much of the book takes place in and is shaped by the small town in which the characters live, and it's all quite well-done. I don't want to go into much more to spoil the plot, as it does keep you guessing. A lot of what happened surprised me, which I always enjoy (doesn't often happen in a thriller). Overall, this one was different but enjoyable, buoyed by its strong characters and complex plot. Blog ~ Twitter ~ Facebook ~ Google+ ~ Instagram I received a copy of this novel from the publisher and Edelweiss/Librarything in return for an unbiased review (thank you!); it is available everywhere as 07/24/2018.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Janelle

    Thank you so much TLC Book Tours and William Morrow Books for providing my free copy of THE LAST THING I TOLD YOU by Emily Arsenault- all opinions are my own. I really enjoyed the premise and characterization in this one! Nadine Raines returns to her New England town after being gone several years. She suffers from mental illness and often listens to the voices in her head, including that of her old therapist, Dr. Mark Fabian. But Dr. Mark Fabian was recently murdered, bludgeoned to death in his Thank you so much TLC Book Tours and William Morrow Books for providing my free copy of THE LAST THING I TOLD YOU by Emily Arsenault- all opinions are my own. I really enjoyed the premise and characterization in this one! Nadine Raines returns to her New England town after being gone several years. She suffers from mental illness and often listens to the voices in her head, including that of her old therapist, Dr. Mark Fabian. But Dr. Mark Fabian was recently murdered, bludgeoned to death in his office. He was extremely dedicated to his patients, so who would want to kill him? Detective Henry Peacher investigates the case, discovering Dr. Fabian pulled two files before he died: Johnny Streeter, who is in prison for a mass shooting, and Nadine Raines. This book starts off with a bang, with so many moving parts that keep you guessing, but it does slow down quite a bit after the first half. Ultimately, the format of the book and the character development is what kept my interest. The perspectives alternate between Nadine and Detective Peacher, between past and present. Peacher is such a great character, but my favorite chapters were Nadine’s, as it is incredibly interesting reading her inner monologue, especially regarding Dr. Fabian. Arsenault does a tremendous job touching on the stigma attached to mental illness and humanizing it. I always particularly enjoy it when thrillers address mental illness and include such well-thought-out characters. Although this book is a bit long, it is overall a gripping mystery!

  6. 5 out of 5

    joyce g

    An interesting twisted tale.

  7. 3 out of 5

    Misty (Reds Romance Reviews)

    With the passing of her old therapist Nadine isn't quite sure who to turn to, he tried to help her through the darkest time in her young life, but she struggled to find a way to understand and talk about what she had done with him. During their conversations she left out some of the important details and now her head and her heart are telling her that she needs to come clean to him, but that isn't really an option now that he has passed. Then he starts talking to her, she hears his wisdom floati With the passing of her old therapist Nadine isn't quite sure who to turn to, he tried to help her through the darkest time in her young life, but she struggled to find a way to understand and talk about what she had done with him. During their conversations she left out some of the important details and now her head and her heart are telling her that she needs to come clean to him, but that isn't really an option now that he has passed. Then he starts talking to her, she hears his wisdom floating around in her head, which not only starts to confirm everyone's thoughts about her that she is a little off her rocker, but it also gives her a weird sense of comfort. Then a former classmate, now town detective Henry Peacher discovers some interesting events that took place before the doctors death, and it leads him to Nadine, and the source of another disturbing event that took place in town five years ago. He thinks there is a connection between them and he will stop at nothing to get the answers he wants... The Last Thing I Told You is a shocking psychological thriller that will have you breathless and second guessing yourself at every turn... hold on tight be prepared to be awed! This was quite the read, it was suspenseful, mind twisting, slightly weird, but it all gelled together nicely and made for an enjoyable read, it made me continually question everything I read! Definitely a impressive first read, had everything I look for in a thriller, and made me just curious enough to come back for more! Highly recommend! I requested an advanced copy of this title from the publisher, via Edelweiss, and voluntarily read and reviewed.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Thanks to William Morrow and TLC Book Tours for the free advanced copy in exchange for my honest review. More psychological thrillers for the summer TBR! This was my introduction to Emily Arsenault and I was not disappointed. This was an incredibly atmospheric read and has a slow build that keeps the tension throughout. That opening chapter will pull you right in! Dr. Mark Fabian is dead. He is found bludgeoned to death in his office. As Detective Henry Peacher begins his investigation he discove Thanks to William Morrow and TLC Book Tours for the free advanced copy in exchange for my honest review. More psychological thrillers for the summer TBR! This was my introduction to Emily Arsenault and I was not disappointed. This was an incredibly atmospheric read and has a slow build that keeps the tension throughout. That opening chapter will pull you right in! Dr. Mark Fabian is dead. He is found bludgeoned to death in his office. As Detective Henry Peacher begins his investigation he discovers two patient files that Dr. Fabian had recently pulled. One for Johnny Streeter and one for Nadine Raines - both of these people, ironically, have links to Peacher. I don't want to give away too much more of the plot - I feel like all that you need to know is within the synopsis! Dr. Fabian specialized in mental and personality disorders. This is an element that I love to see incorporated into psychological thrillers because there are so many unknowns when it comes to what makes a person tick. With a character like Nadine, a woman that suffers from multiple personality disorder, her chapters were always interesting to read because she is still talking to Dr. Fabian in her mind.  We alternate between Nadine and Peacher throughout the story. Arsenault does an incredible job weaving these characters and stories together. Equal parts psychological thriller and police procedural, this slower build will keep you sucked in from start to finish as you try to unravel the web that Arsenault so expertly wove for us.  I give this 3.5/5 stars - rounded up for rating

  9. 5 out of 5

    Vicki (sun.sand.and.books)

    4/5 stars. I received a copy of this from my local bookstore. This was actually a pretty good thriller. I haven't read one quite like this in a while. It takes a bit to get used to the changing POV's and the constant switching between the past and present. You really dont know what your going to get once the POV's changed which was unique in its own way. The good thing about this was that it kept me guessing until the end. This book did a great job of giving you such small bits of information at 4/5 stars. I received a copy of this from my local bookstore. This was actually a pretty good thriller. I haven't read one quite like this in a while. It takes a bit to get used to the changing POV's and the constant switching between the past and present. You really dont know what your going to get once the POV's changed which was unique in its own way. The good thing about this was that it kept me guessing until the end. This book did a great job of giving you such small bits of information at once so that you as the reader come your own conclusion about who killed Dr. Fabian. But then by the end when the puzzle pieces come together and your still surprised by the outcome. Trust me on this it isnt one you can see coming. Sometimes with thrillers I find that the reader can basically figure out who the killer is at the half way point. But with this novel there are so many moving parts that its not as straightforward and easy to figure out. The characters were interesting. Ten pages in I thought that one of the main characters was super sketchy and off her rocker. I liked how all of the characters had a history together outside of this big event it added a whole other layer to the story. It also went to some pretty dark places with some of these characters in regards to the murder and some personal issues/trauma that they had experienced as kids and on the job. Overall good read the constant changes between past a present does take a few chapters to get used to, but dont give up.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Milena

    The Last Thing I Told You by Emily Arsenault is a tale of murder of a psychologist in a sleepy New England town and his former patient, who may or may not be involved in his murder. I really enjoyed this slow-burning, character driven suspense. I found both main characters, Henry, the cop investigating the murder, and Nadine, psychologist's former patient and one of the suspects, complex and very interesting. I liked the alternating POVs between Henry and Nadine and I liked short chapters that k The Last Thing I Told You by Emily Arsenault is a tale of murder of a psychologist in a sleepy New England town and his former patient, who may or may not be involved in his murder. I really enjoyed this slow-burning, character driven suspense. I found both main characters, Henry, the cop investigating the murder, and Nadine, psychologist's former patient and one of the suspects, complex and very interesting. I liked the alternating POVs between Henry and Nadine and I liked short chapters that kept me turning pages. Even though the story was unfolding slowly, at no point I was bored, I flew through the book in less than two days. I would recommend this book to suspense and police procedurals lovers. *I won a free copy of The Last Thing I Told You from the publisher via social media giveaway.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Elaine

    The Last Thing I Told You wasn't terrible, but parts of it was redundant and long. ** Spoilers ahead ** When Dr. Mark Fabian, a psychotherapist, is found murdered in his office, hero cop Henry Peacher is assigned to the case. Henry's investigation uncovers links to a shooting five years ago at an affluent care home in which he had taken down the shooter and a brief spate of sexual motivated attacks. The narrative takes the form of two POVs, Henry and Nadine, a former patient who recounts the rea The Last Thing I Told You wasn't terrible, but parts of it was redundant and long. ** Spoilers ahead ** When Dr. Mark Fabian, a psychotherapist, is found murdered in his office, hero cop Henry Peacher is assigned to the case. Henry's investigation uncovers links to a shooting five years ago at an affluent care home in which he had taken down the shooter and a brief spate of sexual motivated attacks. The narrative takes the form of two POVs, Henry and Nadine, a former patient who recounts the reason she was sent to meet with Dr. Fabian two decades ago; troubled and traumatized from the loss of her father from suicide when she was 12 ended in a violent act against a teacher. The chapters are mostly short and peppered with Nadine's constant monologues to her former shrink as if he was still alive. She summarizes some of their sessions, why she did what she did, how she felt, and reveals to the reader that she was intimately involved with the shooter before he committed that vile act, since he was one of the shrink's patients as well. I didn't like Nadine but I didn't dislike her. She talks constantly about trying to act normal and be normal but I don't think she's a sociopathic so much that she is disaffected, troubled and sad. Perhaps she just needs a little attention from her mother. She misses her father, reminisces about times she spent with him and remarks that she was a good student, studious and well behaved before she lashed out with no provocation. Years later, she is still unsure as to why she did what she did yet continually calls herself crazy, a word that inaccurately describes her mental state. Henry is still dealing with his status as the cop who stopped the shooter five years ago. He is also worried about his twin girls, his inability to guarantee their safety and their love for disturbing fairy tales and the madness of living in today's world. He was a dedicated professional and a good man, father and husband. He uncovers the murderer, a decent reveal, through sheer legwork and pounding the pavement. Decent character development aside, the book could have used a serious edit, shave 50 pages off and nothing would be lost. It might have added more urgency and tension toward the end of the book. Nadine rambles about her sessions with Fabian a tad too much and it quickly becomes repetitive. Her constant references to the dead doctor as though she was still speaking to him was distracting and I soon grew bored with her recollection of past events. The recap of her life up to what she is doing now could have been condensed. I love character development as much as the next person but you know the saying, Too much of a good thing is bad. There is a decent twist involving Nadine's father and the identity of the murderer is believable, tying up a couple of loose ends in the process, but monotonous writing and an alienated main character hampered the flow of the story.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Leslie Lindsay

    Dark tale about a woman and her younger, troubled days, a murdered psychologist, and a small town cop. Dr. Mark Fabian is found murdered in his office. His patients are suspected: including former patient, Nadine Raines, and Johnny Streeter, now serving a life sentence for a mass shooting at a local retirement home. But Nadine and Johnny were patients over 20 years ago, in 1997...what could they possibly have to do with Dr. Fabian's death? And why now? THE LAST THING I TOLD YOU (William Morrow/H Dark tale about a woman and her younger, troubled days, a murdered psychologist, and a small town cop. Dr. Mark Fabian is found murdered in his office. His patients are suspected: including former patient, Nadine Raines, and Johnny Streeter, now serving a life sentence for a mass shooting at a local retirement home. But Nadine and Johnny were patients over 20 years ago, in 1997...what could they possibly have to do with Dr. Fabian's death? And why now? THE LAST THING I TOLD YOU (William Morrow/HarperCollins, 2018) is an edgy small town whodunit with alternating POVs and time periods, mostly focused on Nadine and Henry, a police officer-newly-turned-detective. In many cases, Nadine (now an RN) refers to Dr. Fabian in second-person ('you') as if writing him a letter or addressing him, perhaps in a kind of therapy or conversation (but he's dead--no spoiler, this happens right away). I found the therapy sessions fascinating--along with reading Dr. Fabian's notes about his patients--and then I was intrigued that Nadine became a nurse. THE LAST THING I TOLD YOU wasn't quite what I was expecting--it was more police procedural and a twisted mystery that had a less-captivating pay-out than I hoped for. In the end, I felt like it was almost two stories cleaved into one giving it a slightly directionless feel. Will it keep you guessing? Yes. Is it fast-paced? Yes. Is it a little confusing? Yes. THE LAST THING I TOLD YOU reminded me of OUR LITTLE SECRET (Roz Nay) meets DEAR DAUGHTER (Elizabeth Little), YOU (Caroline Kepnes) with a touch of David Bell and Wendy Walker (EMMA IN THE NIGHT). For all my reviews, including author interviews, please see: www.leslielindsay.com Special thanks to William Morrow for this review copy. All thoughts are my own.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jenn

    I received an ARC of this title from the publisher for an honest review. I'm not going to review this one because I didn't get very far. I read about 50 pages in and I didn't really get even the beginnings of a good picture on any of the characters. So I felt nothing for them, or the story. In all likelihood, it probably gets better, but I'm DNFing.

  14. 4 out of 5

    John

    One of my favorite books of the past few years' reading is Emily Arsenault's The Broken Teaglass, a quirky puzzler -- set in the world of lexicography, no less -- that had me grinning whenever it didn't have me on the edge of my seat, and vice versa. It's one of those relatively few books that I've read first from the library, then gone out and bought for myself. Trouble was, I enjoyed it so much it made me nervy of reading more books by Arsenault for fear of being disappointed. Silly me. The Last One of my favorite books of the past few years' reading is Emily Arsenault's The Broken Teaglass, a quirky puzzler -- set in the world of lexicography, no less -- that had me grinning whenever it didn't have me on the edge of my seat, and vice versa. It's one of those relatively few books that I've read first from the library, then gone out and bought for myself. Trouble was, I enjoyed it so much it made me nervy of reading more books by Arsenault for fear of being disappointed. Silly me. The Last Thing I Told You is a more orthodox psychological thriller, but it has a great deal to interest nonetheless. Psychological counselor Mark Fabian has been murdered, found sprawled in his office with his skull bashed in. Investigating cop Henry Peacher soon finds out that two among Fabian's past patients were Peacher's old high school classmate Nadine Raines, sent for therapy years ago after impulsively knifing a teacher, and Johnny Streeter, currently incarcerated for perpetrating a massacre in an old folk's home. Nadine has been back in town over the past few days but seems now to have gone on the lam. What's really happened? Did Nadine kill her old shrink for reasons unknown? Or was Fabian the victim of, in effect, a passing tramp? The tale's told in alternate sections from Henry's and Nadine's viewpoints. Henry's sections comprise a fairly standard police-procedural detective story, but Nadine's contributions, told primarily in the form of unwritten letters or soliloquies to her deceased counselor, play a dancing game in which Arsenault -- with great skill -- keeps back from us the truth of events almost to the very end. Something further that she keeps back becomes obvious only to those Sherlockian souls who chance to read her Goodreads bio: aspects of Nadine's life, like the one-eyed doll who appears often in the cartoons she draws, are based on elements of Arsenault's own life. The solution to the mystery is one of those that seemingly comes out of left field and yet, on reflection, is perfectly fair: the astute reader could, at least in theory, have spotted it from quite early on. But this astute reader -- I flatter myself -- didn't, and I imagine most won't. The narrative seems to wander a bit in the middle, but its constant readability renders this a very minor blemish. The Last Thing I Told You is a most creditable psychological thriller. I must read more of Arsenault's work . . .

  15. 5 out of 5

    Myrna Gottlieb

    I received a free uncorrected proof of "The Last Thing I told You" by Emily Arsenault from Goodreads in exchange for an honest review. This book did not work for me. I found it difficult to follow and repetitive. The genre is psychological suspense with an unreliable narrator. Actually there are two narrators, each one speaking in the first person. A psychoanalyst about to retire has been murdered in his office- bludgeoned to death. We learn about this from a mentally disturbed former patient, Nad I received a free uncorrected proof of "The Last Thing I told You" by Emily Arsenault from Goodreads in exchange for an honest review. This book did not work for me. I found it difficult to follow and repetitive. The genre is psychological suspense with an unreliable narrator. Actually there are two narrators, each one speaking in the first person. A psychoanalyst about to retire has been murdered in his office- bludgeoned to death. We learn about this from a mentally disturbed former patient, Nadine Raines; she's now in her 30s, but she is speaking to the doctor as if he were still alive. They have a history. He'd treated her when she was a troubled 16-year-old who'd stabbed her male teacher in the classroom with a straight razor; she had and still has an impulse for violence. Now she's back in town, revisiting the doctor and carrying a sharp pocket knife. The second narrator is Henry Peacher, a policeman investigating the murder. He had known Nadine briefly in high school; and he'd been in class with her when she'd stabbed the teacher. Only he'd been out on a bathroom break so he hadn't witnessed the act. The narration is often just a page or two long before the switch from Nadine to Henry and back again. I found it hard to follow the rambling thoughts of the mentally ill woman, trying to understand her own mind and her past. And frankly, I lost interest. And the backstory about Henry, his marriage, and his relationship with his young twin daughters- one of whom loved for him to read creepy fairy tales- I didn't see the point of including this material in the book. There's a bit more about Henry. He was a local hero because he'd taken down a terrorist- a30-ish man who'd broken into a local nursing home and shot a whole bunch of people. And there was a connection between the shooter and the murdered doctor, the shooter and Nadine, and the doctor and the nursing home. But this was not disclosed in a way that held my interest. Too much jumping around from Henry to Nadine, from Henry's police investigation to the random thoughts of Nadine. I was tempted to put the book down about halfway through. But since I had been criticized previously by a woman who was angry that I had dared to review a book negatively without finishing it, I soldiered on to the end...when the murder was solved by introducing another character, the murderer, in the last twenty pages or so. That was the twist at the end. To be fair, I will point out that the book reviewer in the NY Times, who has been writing the crime column every other week for years, did like this book and and admires the author for her innovative writing style. But my opinion- I didn't care for the book or the writing style; so I can't recommend it.

  16. 3 out of 5

    Nancy McFarlane

    Mark Fabian, a murdered psychologist, seems to hold all of the secrets as Henry, a detective who grew up in the small town of Campion, tries to gather the clues to the first murder in years. It isn’t long into the investigation when Nadine, a high school classmate of Henry’s, and a long ago patient of Fabian’s soon becomes a suspect. Written from the perspectives of both Nadine and Henry it goes back and forth between past and present. It is methodical, but not slow, as each delve into the secre Mark Fabian, a murdered psychologist, seems to hold all of the secrets as Henry, a detective who grew up in the small town of Campion, tries to gather the clues to the first murder in years. It isn’t long into the investigation when Nadine, a high school classmate of Henry’s, and a long ago patient of Fabian’s soon becomes a suspect. Written from the perspectives of both Nadine and Henry it goes back and forth between past and present. It is methodical, but not slow, as each delve into the secrets of their own troubled pasts. The Last Thing I Told You is a superb police procedural. In addition it delves deeply into the world of psychological trauma and gives us a look at how events during adolescence can affect the young mind. And, it has an ending that was totally unpredictable – unless you are as good a detective as Henry.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Whitney

    I received a free copy of this book in exchange for a review. What I wish I'd also received was a better pay-off for a story with a lot of promise. Generally, I like novels about therapists and psychologists. The variety of patient stories, the struggle for their own stability, and the chance of great surprise when it turns out they are much scarier than anything you’d hear in their sessions. Not everybody can be Hannibal, but there’s always that chance that the plaid suit and the kitchen utensi I received a free copy of this book in exchange for a review. What I wish I'd also received was a better pay-off for a story with a lot of promise. Generally, I like novels about therapists and psychologists. The variety of patient stories, the struggle for their own stability, and the chance of great surprise when it turns out they are much scarier than anything you’d hear in their sessions. Not everybody can be Hannibal, but there’s always that chance that the plaid suit and the kitchen utensils will come out by the tenth session. I got hooked into this particular story with the promise of a mystery and an unraveling patient-doctor relationship. The book opens in the office of Mark Fabian, therapist for years and corpse for hours. His head is bashed in, his patient notes are sketchy, and oh, by the way, his closest friends report him as having memory problems recently, so good luck with those notes again. The chapters alternate between narrators Henry, a local cop who gained fame from a retirement home shooting a few years previously, and Nadine, a former patient of Fabian’s. I’m still getting my head around a shooter in a frigging *retirement home.* Not that it’s too farfetched these days, but what the what? Nadine’s story alternates between the present and 1997, when she was in therapy after a violent incident at school – with all this backstory, you expect her underlying psychosis to be something shocking. She even writes that perversion is in her blood (cue dramatic music). I don’t know if the author planned something bigger to explain the build-up to the outburst and then gave up or we’re actually supposed to be shocked by something that turns out to be terribly garden-variety. Henry’s side of things covers his involvement in the shooting (he took down a shooter and is now a local hero who just wants people to stop calling him that) and his attempt to piece together how Fabian (I kept reading that as ‘Fabio’) wound up dead. Oh, and his kids are getting warped by fairytales with iron shoes and decapitations. I don’t know if that’s supposed to be a cautionary bit about your kids winding up in therapy or a suggestion for scary stuff hidden in children’s fiction. Either way, now I want to read ‘The Red Shoes.’ Honestly, this book felt like such a tangled mess that I can barely write this review. It started out so readable and then just seemed to drag into wet noodles. Other crimes in the area are mentioned, but written in an almost throw-away fashion, even though they are suddenly a big deal for the ending. There’s no startling reveal of some long-buried secret to explain Nadine’s violence. There’s no startling reveal that Henry is someone interesting. Fabian’s murder has one of the most beige explanations I’ve ever read. If a book starts out crap and then ends the same way, that’s bad. This whole bait-and-switch thing seems even worse, because now you’ve had a chance to get excited over where things are going. Surely this will not end in you slapping yourself awake at nine p.m. and throwing the book into the library donation bag. Just because I was almost asleep doesn’t mean I take the whole bait-and-switch thing lying down. I won’t be looking for anything else by this author. Now if someone will introduce me to a nice novel involving a suit and fork…

  18. 4 out of 5

    Molly

    I received an ARC of this book via Goodreads Giveaways. This is a perfectly fine mystery, alternating between the perspective of a small-town cop and a small-town girl, Nadine, who once committed a "shocking act of violence" against a high school teacher and is now a suspect in the death of her former psychologist. Though the initial act of violence isn't nearly as shocking as I anticipated, it is certainly one that would rattle a small town community. Nadine is convinced that there is some kind I received an ARC of this book via Goodreads Giveaways. This is a perfectly fine mystery, alternating between the perspective of a small-town cop and a small-town girl, Nadine, who once committed a "shocking act of violence" against a high school teacher and is now a suspect in the death of her former psychologist. Though the initial act of violence isn't nearly as shocking as I anticipated, it is certainly one that would rattle a small town community. Nadine is convinced that there is some kind of deep dark badness in her because of something her father may have done way back when she was a kid; something blurted out by her mother in a rage. I had a difficult time believing that this one mention of a *possible* act would condemn Nadine to forever believing that she was destined to turn out wrong. There are a lot of hints as to a darkness in Nadine, but these never really come to fruition, and I found that aspect of the book frustrating. Nadine's father's past and the the mystery of who killed her former shrink are intertwined, and that does resolve itself in a fairly satisfying way - I just could have done without all the misdirection regarding Nadine's character and motives.

  19. 3 out of 5

    Shannon (Mrsreadsbooks)

    This book is told from two different perspectives: Nadine Raines and Detective Henry Peacher. Nadine Raines has returned home to her quiet New England hometown, only to have her former psychologist Dr. Mark Fabian, found dead in his office two days after her return. Nadine isn't quite sure why she returned to her hometown, since everyone here thinks she is crazy due to a violent act she committed as a teenager. Detective Henry Peacher makes an interesting discovery while he is investigating the This book is told from two different perspectives: Nadine Raines and Detective Henry Peacher. Nadine Raines has returned home to her quiet New England hometown, only to have her former psychologist Dr. Mark Fabian, found dead in his office two days after her return. Nadine isn't quite sure why she returned to her hometown, since everyone here thinks she is crazy due to a violent act she committed as a teenager. Detective Henry Peacher makes an interesting discovery while he is investigating the death of Dr. Fabian. He finds that shortly before his death, the doctor pulled out files on two prior patients; Nadine and Johnny Streeter. Johnny Streeter is currently in prison on a life sentence for a mass shooting that devastated the town. As Henry continues his investigation, he beings to wonder if there are any connections between Nadine and Johnny, as well as trying to explain some of Nadine's behavior since returning to town. This was definitely an interesting story and I liked the alternating POV's between Nadine and Henry. I have to say Nadine isn't my favorite character and I also didn't really like how she continued to talk to the doctor in her head. I did like Henry and enjoyed reading from his perspective the most. Though I have found that in psychological thrillers like this, I do find it interesting to have the alternating POV's between a possible suspect and the detective. This is the first book I have read by the author and overall I enjoyed it; it was fairly fast paced in the beginning but began to slow down towards the end. I look forward to reading more from the author in the future. Thank you to the publisher, William Morrow Books, for sending me an ARC of this book.

  20. 3 out of 5

    Betty

    In this psychological thriller, Dr. Mark Fabian is found murdered in his office. The case is handled by Detective Henry Peacher, lifelong resident of this quiet town in Maine. Henry discovers that shortly before his death Fabian, a psychologist, had pulled the files of two of his former clients - Nadine Raines and Johnny Streeter. The story alternates between Henry’s investigation in the present and Nadine “talking” to Fabian – in her head. At sixteen, Nadine had committed a shocking, violent act In this psychological thriller, Dr. Mark Fabian is found murdered in his office. The case is handled by Detective Henry Peacher, lifelong resident of this quiet town in Maine. Henry discovers that shortly before his death Fabian, a psychologist, had pulled the files of two of his former clients - Nadine Raines and Johnny Streeter. The story alternates between Henry’s investigation in the present and Nadine “talking” to Fabian – in her head. At sixteen, Nadine had committed a shocking, violent act upon a teacher. Henry remembers Nadine quite well – she was a former classmate of his. Streeter is now in prison serving a life sentence for a mass shooting five years earlier at Brookhaven Manor Retirement Community. Henry muses upon why these two files were pulled. Is there a connection between them? Why did Nadine recently return after having been away for many years? Why did Nadine see Fabian again after nearly twenty years? Henry zeroes in on one thread that seems to connect Nadine, Johnny, and Fabian. Arsenault writes unflinchingly of the struggle Nadine, mentally ill, deals with on a daily basis. She had a difficult childhood and strives unsuccessfully to understand her dark impulses. After the incident with her teacher the entire town thinks she is crazy, a stigma she cannot escape. But does it mean she is killer? Overall, the book is fast-paced but did begin to lag a little over halfway through. Some of the chapters seemed to repeat themselves, adding no new information. But by that point I was intrigued and wanted to know how it turned out. Arsenault’s skillful use of red herrings along the way kept me questioning the conclusion. Thank you to William Morrow Books for the advance reading copy.

  21. 3 out of 5

    Melinda

    Thank you goodreads, this was a giveaway win! Honestly, this one was a little boring. It was a little slow, and alot of stiff I felt that was just filler, it didn't really have anything to do with what was going on.... The story takes place in Campion, Connecticut. It goes back and forth between Detective Henry Preacher, who is investigating the death of therapist Mark Fabian and Nadine Raines, a former patient of Fabian's. Nadine is not a very likeable character, she was kinda boring, neurotic an Thank you goodreads, this was a giveaway win! Honestly, this one was a little boring. It was a little slow, and alot of stiff I felt that was just filler, it didn't really have anything to do with what was going on.... The story takes place in Campion, Connecticut. It goes back and forth between Detective Henry Preacher, who is investigating the death of therapist Mark Fabian and Nadine Raines, a former patient of Fabian's. Nadine is not a very likeable character, she was kinda boring, neurotic and just plain weird. She has a strange fascination with older men and trying to "break" them, which leads to an incident in high school, that lands her in therapy with Fabian. Fast foward twenty years, and Nadine comes back to town for the holiday's and decides to stop in for a visit with Fabian, and she discovers his dead body. Scared, she takes off. Henry was an ok character, though we don't really learn to much about him beyond the fact that he's married and has twin 5 year old girls. We basically just follow along with him as he investigates, trying to figure out who murdered Dr. Fabian. The ending definitely wasn't what I was expecting, but it wasn't an OH MY GOODNESS moment either. I was like, really, that was it, that was the big mystery? Yeah i was kind of disappointed. This is the first book of Emily Arsenault's that I've read, and like I said I wasn't really impressed, but I'd give her another shot with a different book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tracy (The Pages In-Between)

    Thank you to William Morrow Books #Partner for gifting me this copy. All opinions are my own. I rate this book a 3 out of 5 Stars. This book started at a blazing speed for me, I blew through the first 100 pages the first night I picked it up, but sadly it slowed down for me quite a bit. This is a very long book, and there is a lot of info dump and backstory. It almost feels like this was two separate books mashed together. I think just a book focused on Nadine, and what she did to her teacher and Thank you to William Morrow Books #Partner for gifting me this copy. All opinions are my own. I rate this book a 3 out of 5 Stars. This book started at a blazing speed for me, I blew through the first 100 pages the first night I picked it up, but sadly it slowed down for me quite a bit. This is a very long book, and there is a lot of info dump and backstory. It almost feels like this was two separate books mashed together. I think just a book focused on Nadine, and what she did to her teacher and why, would have been an amazing story on its own. However, the Author added an extra layer into this book, and a whole extra plot, granted she did tie it up nicely at the end, and brought the story to a close.  I appreciate the touch on the stigma that is placed on mental health, and I appreciate mental health being the focus of this book. I wanted clarification, on a few things, I do not want to be too specific on what, but if you've read this book, you probably know what I am talking about. Now, I'd like to point out what I did like. I liked the character development, it does kind of read like a character study, Also Nadine's chapters were written in a way like she was talking to Fabian (The Therapist) like she was telling him her story, and Henry's chapters were told in third person, so it made for an interesting read. I think this would be the perfect book for someone who wants to start getting into the thriller genre, but has an aversion to psychological and domestic thrillers. This one comes across more soft, and more so like a police procedural/mystery. Nothing overly graphic or disturbing. So I think it's a good beginner book. Overall, this was not a favorite for me, but I do appreciate the good qualities of this book. I do believe a lot of readers will enjoy this one. The cover is very pretty, so if "Cover Buys" are your thing, you're going to want this one! If you've read it, what are your thoughts? Share in the comments so we can chat!

  23. 3 out of 5

    Phyllis Krall

    When the body of a therapist is discovered in his office, a former patient, Nadine Raines is discovered back in town after twenty years. She cannot stop rehashing her early therapy sessions with Dr. Fabian when she committed a shocking act as a teenager. Detective Henry Peacher tries to solve the crime, looking at the Dr’s files where he makes shocking discoveries about Nadine and other patients. Nothing is as it seems. There are so many twists that played with my mind, often confusing me. A tota When the body of a therapist is discovered in his office, a former patient, Nadine Raines is discovered back in town after twenty years. She cannot stop rehashing her early therapy sessions with Dr. Fabian when she committed a shocking act as a teenager. Detective Henry Peacher tries to solve the crime, looking at the Dr’s files where he makes shocking discoveries about Nadine and other patients. Nothing is as it seems. There are so many twists that played with my mind, often confusing me. A totally unexpected ending when the truth is revealed. I received this dark psychological thriller from Goodreads in exchange for an honest review. Told in alternating voices of Natalie and Henry, the book jumps from past to present, culminating in an unbelievable discovery.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    A therapist is found murdered in his office and the trail seems to lead to a former patient of his. Nadine, at the age of sixteen stabbed her teacher for no apparent reason. She now believes that there is something bad inside her and always seems to be running. We learn her story as she ‘talks’ to the dead therapist. Henry, is the detective assigned to the case which leads him all over the place. As he tracks down Nadine, he also discovers that a mass murderer, Johnny Streeter was a past patient A therapist is found murdered in his office and the trail seems to lead to a former patient of his. Nadine, at the age of sixteen stabbed her teacher for no apparent reason. She now believes that there is something bad inside her and always seems to be running. We learn her story as she ‘talks’ to the dead therapist. Henry, is the detective assigned to the case which leads him all over the place. As he tracks down Nadine, he also discovers that a mass murderer, Johnny Streeter was a past patient of the doctor and may have a link to Nadine. But he is in prison and has been for some time. This is some psychological thriller and it had me guessing as to what is going on and what will happen. Both Nadine and Henry are characters that I enjoyed learning about. It was a good read.

  25. 3 out of 5

    Onceinabluemoon

    Almost skipped this, but once I started it was easy to slip into, thought it was a fresh perspective, an easy thriller, something I appreciate when so many books are just to violent for my liking.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Gloria Cangahuala

    This book had an intriguing premise. Psychotherapist Dr. Mark Fabian is found murdered in his office. Detective Henry Peacher, who is investigating the case, finds himself delving deep into the past, into the lives of Fabian's former patients, the history of the local senior home, and his own personal connections to the small town of Campion, where the murder took place and where Detective Peacher is based. Who wanted Fabian dead, or -- more accurately -- who didn't want him dead? Unfortunately, This book had an intriguing premise. Psychotherapist Dr. Mark Fabian is found murdered in his office. Detective Henry Peacher, who is investigating the case, finds himself delving deep into the past, into the lives of Fabian's former patients, the history of the local senior home, and his own personal connections to the small town of Campion, where the murder took place and where Detective Peacher is based. Who wanted Fabian dead, or -- more accurately -- who didn't want him dead? Unfortunately, as soon as I reached page 6 I knew I wasn't going to like author Emily Arsenault. (This is the first book of hers that I've ever read.) Why? Because she uses unnecessary jargon (and unexplained jargon, mind you) that makes the language awkward and comes across as her trying too hard to be "cool." Here is the specific example of what I'm talking about: Fabian's body is found, and in describing it, Arsenault says, "He had the rig..." Why not just say, "Rigor mortis had set in" or something to that effect. I wasted a good 30 seconds trying to make sense of the phrase "he had the rig" before I finally figured out that she was talking about rigor mortis. No sentences near that phrase described anything like stiffness in the body; had that been the case, it would have been obvious what "rig" meant. As soon as I read this phrase and figured out what it meant, I groaned and thought, "Wow, Arsenault is trying way too hard, and it's not coming across well." I went into the rest of the book hesitantly. Another strange use of language was a little bit later in the book when Det. Peacher was talking one-on-one with another person and a door behind him opens and closes as the police chief walks in. A simple thing that doesn't need any attention-calling, right? Not according to Arsenault. In this scene she is oddly far too descriptive when simply describing the door opening and closing. I was expecting it to lead to more, but no, it was just a door opening and closing. I was extremely puzzled by this description. What was the point? I quote it here: "There was a sound behind me. A clank-clunk that I felt first in my chest, and that seemed to shoot halfway up my throat...I whipped around. Because I'd been facing Melissa, I hadn't seen Chief Wheeler approach the building. The sound was him pushing open the building's heavy institutional door." And that's it. Nothing more happens. The chief doesn't even stop to talk to Peacher. What the heck was the point of using an entire paragraph for this? Arsenault could simply have said something like, "I heard the building's heavy institutional door open and close behind me and turned around to see Chief Wheeler make his way to Fabian's office." The melodramatic language and extended description that Arsenault uses was awkward and pointless. Her editor should have caught this. Ok, enough about the author's use of language. Let's talk about the plot. This was not a tightly written plot. When Peacher delves into Fabian's past and starts to investigate the past and present life of former patient Nadine Raines, a lot comes out about Nadine's past that is actually rather intriguing. But what appears to be a significant plot point is Nadine's relationship with another of Fabian's patients at the time. Arsenault invests a good bit of the book on Peacher's following this line of investigation, and in doing so did have me in her suspenseful grip as I wondered how this part of Nadine's life was going to play into Fabian's death. ******spoiler below******* When I finished the book, I realized everything that had to do with Nadine's past relationship had absolutely NOTHING to do with the resolution of the mystery. Nothing at all. Nothing. I couldn't believe it. The loose ends of Nadine's past family life, Nadine's past relationship with the other patient, and the Brookhaven nursing home's current state of affairs never tied up. The murderer had nothing to do with Nadine. The motive for the murder had nothing to do with Nadine. The entire resolution was almost completely unrelated to the bulk of the book leading up to it. What? I was disbelieving. No, I didn't see the resolution coming; I couldn't have predicted the murderer because the murderer wasn't even introduced into the book until more than 3/4 through the book. So, overall, the book was disappointing. I give it a generous 3 stars because there were moments where I did feel drawn in, but the fact that a good chunk of the book ended up being irrelevant to the resolution was highly disappointing.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lori L (She Treads Softly)

    The Last Thing I Told You by Emily Arsenault is a highly recommended psychological mystery/police procedural. When therapist Dr. Mark Fabian is found Bludgeoned to death in his office, it shakes the town of Campion, Connecticut. In the opening chapter former patient Nadine Raines finds Fabian's body and flees, full of conflicting emotions and introspection. After a violent incident at the local high school, she was a patient of Fabian's 20 years ago, starting when she was sixteen until she went o The Last Thing I Told You by Emily Arsenault is a highly recommended psychological mystery/police procedural. When therapist Dr. Mark Fabian is found Bludgeoned to death in his office, it shakes the town of Campion, Connecticut. In the opening chapter former patient Nadine Raines finds Fabian's body and flees, full of conflicting emotions and introspection. After a violent incident at the local high school, she was a patient of Fabian's 20 years ago, starting when she was sixteen until she went off to college at eighteen. Nadine's chapters find her contemplating and replaying events from her life, including her sessions with the doctor. Why did she come back to see the doctor after so many years away? Henry Peacher is the detective investigating Fabian’s death. He is a local hero after he stopped mass shooter Johnny Streeter's killing spree at a nursing home five years previously. Now, as he tries to piece together clues found in Fabian's office, he knows he needs to look into the doctors patients. His search leads him to two old files that the doctor had pulled and left out in his home. One file is Nadine's; the other file is Johnny Streeter's. Are the two connected? Henry also remembers Nadine from high school and the incident that lead her to therapy. Could she still have the same violent tendencies or hold a grudge against the doctor? I really enjoyed the alternating chapters from the viewpoints of Nadine Raines and Detective Henry Preacher. Both are nuanced, well developed, imperfect characters. Henry Preacher is a great, realistically portrayed character and I loved the chapters following the police investigation. Nadine's chapters brought in the psychological thriller aspects to the novel. She is tormented still from her past. Much of her inner monologue is addressed to the doctor, as if she is still in therapy with him, and also dwells on other events from her past and childhood. The Last Thing I Told You is really a enjoyable, well written novel with a nice twist at the end. It's not really a shocking thriller, but it is a very satisfying investigation with some psychological unease provided by Nadine's inner commentary. The suspense does continue to build gradually as the investigation continues and Nadine's commentary provides more background information. The setting, in a small town where everyone always seems to know everyone else, adds an additional dimension to the novel. I found the ending very satisfying because it reflected how an investigation might suddenly take an oblique turn, based on evidence, to find a resolution to the case. Disclosure: My review copy was courtesy of William Marrow. http://www.shetreadssoftly.com/2018/0...

  28. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Colotta

    My Highly Caffeinated Thought: A smart, intricate, and multi-layered suspense which will keep you guessing until the end. THE LAST THING I TOLD YOU is one of those books where you think you are heading down one path and then something happens to make you question everything you already know. To say this story kept me on my toes would be an understatement. What I truly enjoyed was the author's writing. The way she built the layers of the narrative kept it moving forward in a way I wasn't expecting My Highly Caffeinated Thought: A smart, intricate, and multi-layered suspense which will keep you guessing until the end. THE LAST THING I TOLD YOU is one of those books where you think you are heading down one path and then something happens to make you question everything you already know. To say this story kept me on my toes would be an understatement. What I truly enjoyed was the author's writing. The way she built the layers of the narrative kept it moving forward in a way I wasn't expecting. When I started the book, I found I easily came to believe who was to blame. I fell into the carefully created trap Arsenault set for me. However, soon came the realization things were not quite what they seem. For me, this is where the book gets interesting. In THE LAST THING I TOLD YOU, Arsenault gives her readers flawed characters set in a world where truth is manipulated. This richly tense suspense novel will have you questioning everything while still giving a conclusion which seems so apparent once you have finished. I couldn't have thought the book would end the way it did, but I can't see it shaking out any other way. This is the first book I read by the author and I have a feeling I will be reading more in the future. Reviewer Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publisher and TLC Book Tours in exchange for an honest review. Highly Caffeinated Rating of… ☕ ☕ ☕ ☕ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ Follow the Highly Caffeinated Victoria Colotta: Website | Facebook | Twitter @vcolotta | Instagram | Goodreads ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦

  29. 3 out of 5

    Amalie Turner

    I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. I really enjoyed this book in the beginning. It read fast, I was invested in figuring out the secret and discovering the truth about who killed Dr. Fabian, but the ending kind of killed the rest of the story for me. I felt as if the author purposefully sent the reader's attention towards one specific subject, she made this character's actions feel as if they are expressing guilt, making the reader feel like they know the I received an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. I really enjoyed this book in the beginning. It read fast, I was invested in figuring out the secret and discovering the truth about who killed Dr. Fabian, but the ending kind of killed the rest of the story for me. I felt as if the author purposefully sent the reader's attention towards one specific subject, she made this character's actions feel as if they are expressing guilt, making the reader feel like they know the outcome, but then the author give the reader more information that points in a totally different direction. Don't get me wrong, I love a good twist ending, especially if I didn't see it coming, but I get frustrated when the twist comes without enough information for the reader to even try and figure it out. This book felt obvious and predictable, but not necessarily in a bad way because we didn't really know the motive for what seemed like the obvious character responsible, but then the killer is revealed and it comes out that many of the things we thought we knew as reader's was wrong, but it was wrong because we were given wrong information. I appreciate the desire to give readers a shock, especially one they didn't see coming, but we also need to be given little hints to be able to feel like we missed what was right in front of us. I feel like this book was trying to do what Dark Places by Gillian Flynn did. When we finally get to answers we want, we are surprised but the answers didn't come from totally out of the blue.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    [I recieced an arc for an honest review]  I was intrigued from the first page / prologue. 13 sentences that's all that the prologue was made of and it automatically had me excited to read the book. Yet, at some point my interest faded and I can't tell you exactly why that was. The book consisted of two point of views. The first being Nadine, and we see through her eyes as a teen and as an adult. As a young girl she has no idea what is going on in her own mind, and she lacks the ability to cope wit [I recieced an arc for an honest review]  I was intrigued from the first page / prologue. 13 sentences that's all that the prologue was made of and it automatically had me excited to read the book. Yet, at some point my interest faded and I can't tell you exactly why that was. The book consisted of two point of views. The first being Nadine, and we see through her eyes as a teen and as an adult. As a young girl she has no idea what is going on in her own mind, and she lacks the ability to cope with her fathers death and her life in general. As an adult she silently struggles and tries to work through things by talking, in her mind, to her deceased therapist. The other point of view was of Henry Preacher, the cop investigating the therapist's death. I really enjoyed his characters and the little we got to learn about his relationship with his daughters and his own internal struggles. I found myself more interested in his character than the actual story line about who killed the therapist and why. Overall Emily Arsenault did a good job at weaving the facts and discoveries of the case between the pages so everything slowly comes together. I can honestly say I didn't see the ending concluding the way it did. This is the first book I have ever read by Emily Arsenault, and I would be interested in reading her other work. 3/5🌟

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