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Great Tales of Horror

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H.P. Lovecraft wrote horror stories like no other author before of after him. In the pages of Weird Tales and other pulp-fiction magazines of the 1920s and '30s, Lovecraft pioneered a new type of story that fused the thrills of supernatural horror with the visionary concepts of science fiction. His unique style of cosmic horror revolutionized the modern horror tale through H.P. Lovecraft wrote horror stories like no other author before of after him. In the pages of Weird Tales and other pulp-fiction magazines of the 1920s and '30s, Lovecraft pioneered a new type of story that fused the thrills of supernatural horror with the visionary concepts of science fiction. His unique style of cosmic horror revolutionized the modern horror tale through its depiction of a vast universe indifferent to human existence and populated by incomprehensibly alien monsters. This volume collects twenty of Lovecraft's best-known horror stories, including several that laid the foundation for the Cthulhu Mythos, a pattern of myth and lore that represents the high point of his writing and once of the most original contributions to fantastic fiction of the past century. Selections include: "Pickman's Model" The monsters in Richard Upton Pickman's paintings were so hideously lifelike you might easily believe that they had been painted from real life. "The Rats in the Walls" The nightly scramblings of foraging rats in the walls were disturbing enough -- but what horror did their destination belowground suggest? "The Call of Cthulhu" An island risen from the depths of the Pacific Ocean houses a denizen whose emergence in our world portends the end of life as we know it. "At the Mountains of Madness" In the wastes of Antarctica, an exploration team discovers the remnants of an inconceivably ancient pre-human civilization -- and evidence that whatever wiped it out may still be at large. H.P. Lovecraft: Great Tales of Horror is your passport to unique worlds of wonder and terror as only one of the greatest horror writers of all time could imagine them.


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H.P. Lovecraft wrote horror stories like no other author before of after him. In the pages of Weird Tales and other pulp-fiction magazines of the 1920s and '30s, Lovecraft pioneered a new type of story that fused the thrills of supernatural horror with the visionary concepts of science fiction. His unique style of cosmic horror revolutionized the modern horror tale through H.P. Lovecraft wrote horror stories like no other author before of after him. In the pages of Weird Tales and other pulp-fiction magazines of the 1920s and '30s, Lovecraft pioneered a new type of story that fused the thrills of supernatural horror with the visionary concepts of science fiction. His unique style of cosmic horror revolutionized the modern horror tale through its depiction of a vast universe indifferent to human existence and populated by incomprehensibly alien monsters. This volume collects twenty of Lovecraft's best-known horror stories, including several that laid the foundation for the Cthulhu Mythos, a pattern of myth and lore that represents the high point of his writing and once of the most original contributions to fantastic fiction of the past century. Selections include: "Pickman's Model" The monsters in Richard Upton Pickman's paintings were so hideously lifelike you might easily believe that they had been painted from real life. "The Rats in the Walls" The nightly scramblings of foraging rats in the walls were disturbing enough -- but what horror did their destination belowground suggest? "The Call of Cthulhu" An island risen from the depths of the Pacific Ocean houses a denizen whose emergence in our world portends the end of life as we know it. "At the Mountains of Madness" In the wastes of Antarctica, an exploration team discovers the remnants of an inconceivably ancient pre-human civilization -- and evidence that whatever wiped it out may still be at large. H.P. Lovecraft: Great Tales of Horror is your passport to unique worlds of wonder and terror as only one of the greatest horror writers of all time could imagine them.

30 review for Great Tales of Horror

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jenna B.

    Cthulhu thinks you are a dust mote. I'm just kidding; Cthulhu doesn't think about you at all. The joy of reading H.P. Lovecraft's fiction in one giant helping is the clear emergence of his mythology: namely, that from the perspective of the cosmos, the fleeting, cranky species known as homo sapien doesn't even register on the radar. Our mistake is not in believing in the existence in aliens, but believing that we are interesting enough to warrant abduction and extensive probing. Lovecraft's fict Cthulhu thinks you are a dust mote. I'm just kidding; Cthulhu doesn't think about you at all. The joy of reading H.P. Lovecraft's fiction in one giant helping is the clear emergence of his mythology: namely, that from the perspective of the cosmos, the fleeting, cranky species known as homo sapien doesn't even register on the radar. Our mistake is not in believing in the existence in aliens, but believing that we are interesting enough to warrant abduction and extensive probing. Lovecraft's fiction has a prescience that stems partially from his anticipation of nuclear panic and our evolutionary history, and also from his place as grandfather to modern horror. Stephen King and Wes Craven, bow down! Now, if anyone can tell me where I can find a good copy of the Necronomicon? I'm in the mood for untold horrors beyond human conception.

  2. 3 out of 5

    Wilum Pugmire

    This book collects all of the very best magnificent fiction of H. P. Lovecraft. Strangely, the constant complaint against the stories here at Goodreads is that they are all too similar, but this is absurd--none of these stories resemble each other. "The Colour out of Space" is as unique a tale as is "The Haunter of the Dark," with no similarities, except for excellence in the writing. Lovecraft's weird tales have depths that can never be completely plumbed, and thus one can return to his work ag This book collects all of the very best magnificent fiction of H. P. Lovecraft. Strangely, the constant complaint against the stories here at Goodreads is that they are all too similar, but this is absurd--none of these stories resemble each other. "The Colour out of Space" is as unique a tale as is "The Haunter of the Dark," with no similarities, except for excellence in the writing. Lovecraft's weird tales have depths that can never be completely plumbed, and thus one can return to his work again and again and always find new wonders. I've been reading him constantly since the early 1970's, and his stories never lose their richness, their eeriness, their beauty. Even the lesser tales, such as "The Hound" and "The Unnamable," have much to offer the reader. Lovecraft's approach to the weird is entirely his own, and he brilliantly blended supernatural aspects with the then new genre of science fiction. His imagination is ingenious, and he can be extremely scary. His main interest as an author was the creation of mood and atmosphere. People have condemned his lack of ability in portraying characters, but the people of his fiction serve as tools that have a precise function, and yet he makes them fascinating and unique. What a great book!!

  3. 3 out of 5

    Julie Rylie

    The Call of Cthulhu - read before The Colour out of Space - read before The Lurking Fear - about some evil inside a house that possessed one of the sons and destroyed the whole family The Music of Erich Zann - Erich Zann plays music like a mad man at night without being able to stop, he is possessed by some dark force. The street where his house was cannot be found anymore and also not the building. I loved this story btw Dagon Dagon is the beginning of the Cthulu imaginary <3 Dagon the fish god. The Call of Cthulhu - read before The Colour out of Space - read before The Lurking Fear - about some evil inside a house that possessed one of the sons and destroyed the whole family The Music of Erich Zann - Erich Zann plays music like a mad man at night without being able to stop, he is possessed by some dark force. The street where his house was cannot be found anymore and also not the building. I loved this story btw Dagon Dagon is the beginning of the Cthulu imaginary <3 Dagon the fish god. The guy that sees him gets insane, not even morphine can help him, until the end of his days he will always see Dagon Pickman’s Model Pickman's model was a real monster that lived in a haunted house. Pickman's portraits where terrible and gruesome. The Dunwich Horror - read before The Statement of Randolph Carter - read before In the Vault about a guy that is an undertaker and gets stuck in a mausoleum and piles coffins to get out of there, he can get away from there and swears to everybody he was being pulled down from his ankles from a living dead corpses but nobody believed him... Cool AirAbout a guy that has been dead for 18 years but is still alive with the help of some machines and water. The Thing on the DoorstepThis tale is fucking great! It's about black magic and this wicked family that can transfer their souls into other people's bodies The Dreams in the Witch House Also really liked this tale. It is about a haunted house that is rented to several people that lie in separate rooms, and all of them have a different perspective from what is happening. There is a witch, a black entity, two evil men, a weird creature that looks like a monster rat, a child that gets sacrificed and a guy that ends up dying after having all these weird very vividly dreams with all the evil creatures that live in a parallel dimension. The Shadow over Innsmouth - read before and am in love with it At the Mountains of Madness - read before and am in love with it Herbert West—Reanimator - read before and also am in love with it The Rats in the Walls - read before The Case of Charles Dexter Ward The Whisperer in Darkness The Haunter of the Dark - read before The Shadow out of Time

  4. 3 out of 5

    sanne_reads

    The Call of Cthulhu: 4* Brr.. The Colour out of Space: 5* I'm scared The Lurking fear: 4,5* I'm still scared The music of Erich Zann: 3* Dagon: 3* Pickman's model: 3,5* The Dunwich horror: 4* The statement of Randolph Carter: 2,5* In the vault: 3,5* Oh, the irony. Cool air: 3 * The Thing on the Doorstep: 3 * The Dreams in the Witch House: 4 * The Shadow over Inssmouth: 4 * At the mountains of Madness: 5* Herbert West- Reanimator: 3* The Rats in the Walls: 4* The Case of Charles Dexter Ward: 2.5 - 3* The Whisper The Call of Cthulhu: 4* Brr.. The Colour out of Space: 5* I'm scared The Lurking fear: 4,5* I'm still scared The music of Erich Zann: 3* Dagon: 3* Pickman's model: 3,5* The Dunwich horror: 4* The statement of Randolph Carter: 2,5* In the vault: 3,5* Oh, the irony. Cool air: 3 * The Thing on the Doorstep: 3 * The Dreams in the Witch House: 4 * The Shadow over Inssmouth: 4 * At the mountains of Madness: 5* Herbert West- Reanimator: 3* The Rats in the Walls: 4* The Case of Charles Dexter Ward: 2.5 - 3* The Whisperer in Darkness: The Haunter of the Dark: 4* The Shadow Out of Time: 3.5*

  5. 5 out of 5

    Aja: The Narcoleptic Ninja

    So I finally got the chance to finish this monster when hurricane Irma left me without power for a week. Nothing like sitting in the dark with a horror story while watching all your neighbors get power back! Either way, I finished it and I really loved it! There are definitely times where his writing can seem a little slow, but the more I read the more I got used to his style and appreciated the story-telling. I've been finding myself excited to talk about these stories and recommending them to So I finally got the chance to finish this monster when hurricane Irma left me without power for a week. Nothing like sitting in the dark with a horror story while watching all your neighbors get power back! Either way, I finished it and I really loved it! There are definitely times where his writing can seem a little slow, but the more I read the more I got used to his style and appreciated the story-telling. I've been finding myself excited to talk about these stories and recommending them to anyone who will listen, and even though I'm not usually a big fan of horror, I'm really glad I gave these a try!

  6. 3 out of 5

    Schmacko

    So much has been written about him, and I get that he redefined horror, adding several new mythologies. I don't feel the need to review this in depth. I will only point out my specific opinion. My issue is that his writing style is florid and thick - not easy on the reader at all. He doesn't provide air, choosing a style with very little dialogue. Many sentences run on. He utilizes LOTS of passive sentences, with multiple dependent and independent clauses. I think he was trying to up the fear by So much has been written about him, and I get that he redefined horror, adding several new mythologies. I don't feel the need to review this in depth. I will only point out my specific opinion. My issue is that his writing style is florid and thick - not easy on the reader at all. He doesn't provide air, choosing a style with very little dialogue. Many sentences run on. He utilizes LOTS of passive sentences, with multiple dependent and independent clauses. I think he was trying to up the fear by writing in a claustrophobic style, but I got quickly tired reading it. It didn't "sail," and I noticed I was furrowing my brows and rereading sentences repeatedly. I personally loved "The Lurking Fear" and think it would make a cool movie, if someone did it well. There were several others I liked. The Cthulu mythos - I think the only reason it's survived is because it was a relatively new and nihilistic type of horror. I like the ideas, but again, the style wore me out. That's all I'll say. I'm sure that's enough to start an endless dialogue on why I'm wrong.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Carol Storm

    I've been a fan of H.P. Lovecraft since I was a teen, but I never bothered to buy a good hardcover edition of his works till I found this one at Barnes & Noble for about $7.99. It was a really good buy! This edition has short classics like "Dagon" and "Cool Air," as well as full-length novella classics like "Shadow Over Innsmouth," "At The Mountains of Madness" and "The Dunwich Horror." The introduction outlines the greatness of this unusual author. Lovecraft can write old-fashioned horror (r I've been a fan of H.P. Lovecraft since I was a teen, but I never bothered to buy a good hardcover edition of his works till I found this one at Barnes & Noble for about $7.99. It was a really good buy! This edition has short classics like "Dagon" and "Cool Air," as well as full-length novella classics like "Shadow Over Innsmouth," "At The Mountains of Madness" and "The Dunwich Horror." The introduction outlines the greatness of this unusual author. Lovecraft can write old-fashioned horror (rotting corpses, rats) but also create mind-bending science fiction (life forms from outer space, life from hundreds of millions of years ago still buried under Antarctic ice.) He is able to create terror with original monsters and with traditional atmosphere with equal skill. This book showcases his genius perfectly. I just wish there was room for my all time Lovecraft favorite, "The Temple!"

  8. 3 out of 5

    Mike

    If you don't know anything about Lovecraft and his stories, look it up on Wikipedia. I'm only going to tell you what I thought of the book. As a collection of short stories (Some could be called Novellas), this runs a whole range of quality. Creepy. Fun. Disturbing. Silly. Dated. Timeless. First you are going to have to suspend your disbelief about what we know in modern science. Even taking into account the fantasy elements, there is a lot that is just plain wrong and can't be explained away. ( If you don't know anything about Lovecraft and his stories, look it up on Wikipedia. I'm only going to tell you what I thought of the book. As a collection of short stories (Some could be called Novellas), this runs a whole range of quality. Creepy. Fun. Disturbing. Silly. Dated. Timeless. First you are going to have to suspend your disbelief about what we know in modern science. Even taking into account the fantasy elements, there is a lot that is just plain wrong and can't be explained away. (*Example being "At the Mountains of Madness." The Antarctic is fully explored, there is no lost city or mountains taller then the Himalayas) Don't worry about it, just roll with it. Second, it's your personal imagination that needs to run wild. These are short stories, simple, usually first person narration, and short. There's not a lot of room for lots of explaining. Let your imagination do some work. Third. The language is a bit dated. Phraseology is different and can be somewhat confusing. This is from an age where class and race distinctions were very important, and it shows in his writing. Also Lovecraft was a racist. A really bad raciest. (by color, religion, nationality, etc.) It's all very true, but try and enjoy the writing, not the writer. Horror is a supposed to be a strong word, and it's used a lot. Along with a pile of synonyms. However, almost 100 years later, we've already seen it all, right. The edginess is a bit worn off. Rather then Great Tails of Horror, "Great Tails of Super Weird and Creepy" might be a better title. But still "Super Weird and Creepy" can be very entertaining. A few stories were a total bust, but mostly this was a good read. I read it on and off for over a year to keep from getting bored by the language. "The Case of Charles Dexter Ward," "Dreams in the Which House," and "The Dunwhich Horror," are my top stories. "Rats in the Walls," and "The Lurking Fear" being close runners up.

  9. 3 out of 5

    Zeke Gonzalez

    I started this hefty tome almost exactly eight months ago because I had been interested in reading Lovecraft for a long time and saw this book was only $9 at Barnes & Nobles... What an excellent purchase. I read a short story or two in between reading other books, and while Lovecraft's prose is dense sometimes, the imagination that he pours into these stories is absolutely stunning. Now that I've read some of his work, I can see how deeply his typography has influenced our culture. His idea I started this hefty tome almost exactly eight months ago because I had been interested in reading Lovecraft for a long time and saw this book was only $9 at Barnes & Nobles... What an excellent purchase. I read a short story or two in between reading other books, and while Lovecraft's prose is dense sometimes, the imagination that he pours into these stories is absolutely stunning. Now that I've read some of his work, I can see how deeply his typography has influenced our culture. His idea that humans are insignificant specks in the universe otherwise populated by monstrous Elder Gods and hideous creatures (the mere sight of which can drive a human mad) has inspired authors, moviemakers, game creators, and much more. These stories cover the whole spectrum of fear, from merely spine-tingling to feverish, page-turning horror, and they're all incredibly original and unique. I highly recommend everybody read a story or two if they've never read H.P. Lovecraft... Cthulu is calling!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Renee

    This was my first time reading any of Lovecraft’s work. His style of writing is very descriptive, often in first person and he can take a while to get the point. Although the stories are slow at times and repetitive I found myself liking them more and more the further I read. The stand outs for me were: The Music of Erich Zann, Cool Air, The Shadow Over Innsmouth, Herbert West - Reanimator and The Case of Charles Dexter Ward. Definitely a great book for fans of horror to have in their collection This was my first time reading any of Lovecraft’s work. His style of writing is very descriptive, often in first person and he can take a while to get the point. Although the stories are slow at times and repetitive I found myself liking them more and more the further I read. The stand outs for me were: The Music of Erich Zann, Cool Air, The Shadow Over Innsmouth, Herbert West - Reanimator and The Case of Charles Dexter Ward. Definitely a great book for fans of horror to have in their collection. Edit: There was blatant racism at times in the book especially with the use of slurs towards African Americans and naming a black cat after such a slur. Not sure how I forgot to put this in initially because it did shock me and was shameful. It is certainly an important detail and something that needs to be pointed out.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Paula Cappa

    This collection of Lovecraft's stories is a good one for Lovecraft fans and those who are discovering or rediscovering Lovecraft. My favorite is Music of Erich Zann which is an eerie story about the supernatural power of music. My preference is the non-mythos stories like The Thing on the Doorstep (which is murder and magic) Cool Air, and In the Vault. Cosmic creatures and the Great Old Ones are what most Lovecraft fans love to gobble up. But I honestly think that the mythos Cthulhu stories have This collection of Lovecraft's stories is a good one for Lovecraft fans and those who are discovering or rediscovering Lovecraft. My favorite is Music of Erich Zann which is an eerie story about the supernatural power of music. My preference is the non-mythos stories like The Thing on the Doorstep (which is murder and magic) Cool Air, and In the Vault. Cosmic creatures and the Great Old Ones are what most Lovecraft fans love to gobble up. But I honestly think that the mythos Cthulhu stories have overshadowed Lovecraft as a writer. In his non-mythos stories you can dig into his richly atmospheric prose and let yourself by completely haunted by his darkness.

  12. 4 out of 5

    David Burke

    I have very little experience with Lovecraft, but I know what an influence his work has been on 20th Century Horror, and I have been more and more intrigued to explore his works. This volume has about 20 of his stories, and from the looks, they are the most famous ones. I am excited! 5/13 I am now 1/3rd of the way through this collection of stories. I hope to be done by the end of May, but I am not a fast reader, and Lovecraft doesn't really allow you to skim. That's one thing I am consistently n I have very little experience with Lovecraft, but I know what an influence his work has been on 20th Century Horror, and I have been more and more intrigued to explore his works. This volume has about 20 of his stories, and from the looks, they are the most famous ones. I am excited! 5/13 I am now 1/3rd of the way through this collection of stories. I hope to be done by the end of May, but I am not a fast reader, and Lovecraft doesn't really allow you to skim. That's one thing I am consistently noticing: he paints very detailed, precise pictures. Some think it's tiresome, while others think it's part of the desired experience. I was listening to an interview with a gentlemen who did a dissertation on Lovecraft on the Horror Etc. Podcast, and the word they use to describe his style is baroque. He even went so far as to suggest that, along with Lovecraft's preference for scholarly protagonists, his style shows how much he admired those who spent their lives studying dense, highly challenging subject matter. This is especially important in light Lovecraft's being unable to complete high school, due to his nervous condition. In essence, Lovecraft wrote as if he was writing for the ivy league, academic audience which he so much wanted to be a part of, but never could. Once I got used to his rhythm, and started using the Kindle app on my phone to help with some of the language, I can say I've very much enjoyed the stories so far. Each piece seems to be part of the same world, and reading them all in close succession like this allows one to appreciate the rich tapestry of imaginative and horrific imagery Lovecraft was creating throughout his career. I enjoyed The Lurking Fear and The Thing on the Doorstep best so far. The latter story had quite a bit more pathos than what I had normally come to expect from him. I felt it was, somehow, more personal..even biographic. The Colour out of Space was an interesting and chilling tale, for sure, but I had trouble actually finding its antagonistic creature frightening. He had some very unique ideas of what an alien, predatory entity could be in a weird universe, and sometimes its hard to wrap your mind around just what he has created on page. The Dunwich Horror and The Dreams in the Witch House struck me as examples of classic, Cthulhu mythos tales, and along with Call of Cthulhu, I recommend them to anyone wanting to get an idea of just what the mythos is about. A final editorial thought before I continue: this edition provides some background for each story, including the circumstances surrounding its publishing. Based on how shabbily his work was found by critics in his time, and yet how influential and important he has become, even since 10-20 years after his death, I think Lovecraft is a great example of why artistic criticism is useless. Literary criticism has its place, certainly, but is mostly useless in predicting future relevance and reception of an author's work. Closing notes: So...I am finished. I took a long, steady journey into Lovecraft-land. I understand why people love him, and I also understand why some would find him tedious. I feel somewhat initiated into the Cthulhu mythos...almost like I just finished a class on cosmic horror. I think what I love most about Lovecraft is his fantastic imagination. I researched his works while reading through this behemoth volume, and found that, while certainly talented, he was rather rough as linguists go, and that is why literature buffs have been so hesitant to embrace him as a great literary mind. But I do believe he deserves the title, and I enjoyed his work very much. I also am ready for some easier reading for a while. For anyone who cannot stand his writing style, if you love horror/scifi, I understand that there are some really good graphic adaptations of his works out there. Do check those out if you cannot enjoy his writing, as it's really his ideas and dreams/nightmares that make him relevant. Some quick notes to any medium level readers, like myself, who want to delve into his work more, heed these tips: Allow his descriptions to paint you a picture and not get in the way of the plot. That is what, I believe, he meant to do. 2. Even if you have his work in print, "cheat", and read in kindle form if possible. I bought his complete works on Kindle for about $4, I took the stories with me to read everywhere and I utilized the word look-up feature heavily. Also, he writes in huge, block paragraphs, and the print of this edition was quite small, so being able to adjust the font helped me get through pages of descriptions. 3. The reason Lovecraft is important is the fantastically horrifying concepts which he developed for his stories. In a time where horror was strictly limited to the realm of werewolves, vampires, and ghosts, he created new and fantastic boogeymen, sometimes just in the form of an insane, alternate reality where nothing of what we know is true or as it seems. Indeed, we'd have no Stephen King's IT or The Thing without Lovecraft. If you read his stories in a collection like this, you can also appreciate the commonalities between them that set them in same, insane universe; a creation of the same scale as Tolkien's Middle-Earth (back off, Ring-nerds!). And last, do some research on the man himself. I found him to be an interesting person, though flawed and even repulsive. If you do this, you find some pathos in his stories, elements connected to who he was as a person, making his writing, somehow, more human.

  13. 4 out of 5

    April

    Whether it's busting my ass wading through relentless enemies in Bloodborne, freaking out in Amnesia or fawning over Necronomicon-inspired art from H.R Giger, which in turn inspired Ridley Scott's Alien, Lovecraft has always been the pinpoint of most things I adore. That aside, I never properly read any of his works until now, and I must say I do feel a fool having waited so long. As best I can understand this book seems to collect most of his most memorable and famous works, such as The Call of Whether it's busting my ass wading through relentless enemies in Bloodborne, freaking out in Amnesia or fawning over Necronomicon-inspired art from H.R Giger, which in turn inspired Ridley Scott's Alien, Lovecraft has always been the pinpoint of most things I adore. That aside, I never properly read any of his works until now, and I must say I do feel a fool having waited so long. As best I can understand this book seems to collect most of his most memorable and famous works, such as The Call of Cthulhu, The Dunwich Horror and At the Mountains of Madness. Although I enjoyed all to a certain degree, I think it's safe to say that all stories have varying degrees of quality, albeit very high quality. Lovecraft weaves cosmic horror into a web of inconceivable atrocities, and it's amazing. Each story teems with existential dread and seemingly normal narratives that fall into horrific disarray; it's no wonder his pieces have continued to inspire and influence modern day media. The only thing I will say, however, is that his writing is at times extremely hard to actually be frightened or unnerved by. Often, with his use of archaisms or highly "abrupt" language, it tends to draw a veil over the reader and lessens the connection between the two, which kind of diminishes the fear impact. It's a shame but I don't think this can be blamed entirely on Lovecraft due to the time in which it was written, nor do I think it affects the enjoyment of reading his work. In fact, I hunger for another Lovecraftian book to devour. Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn. * marks favorite The Call of Cthulhu: 5/5* The Colour out of Space: 4/5* The Lurking Fear: 4/5* The Music of Erich Zann: 3/5 Dagon: 3/5 Pickman's Model: 4* The Dunwich Horror: 4/5* The Statement of Randolph Carter: 3/5 In The Vault: 4/5* Cool Air: 3/5 The Thing on the Doorstep: 4/5* The Dreams in the Witch House: 3/5 The Shadow over Innsmouth: 5/5* At the Mountains of Madness: 4/5 Herbert West -- Reanimator: 5/5* The Rats in the Walls: 5/5* God. This still haunts me. The Case of Charles Dexter Ward: 2/5 The Whisperer in Darkness: 4/5 The Haunter of the Dark: 4/5 The Shadow out of Time: 3/5

  14. 3 out of 5

    Brenda Ayala

    Oh, if only the Cthulhu story was just a little longer!!! The one South Park episode where the BP oil spill releases Cthulhu is probably the most screen time he's ever gotten, and I can't wait for him to get more. Lovecraft's original story is dismally short compared to my expectation. Still fantastic, though. The creepiness factor is still evident. ____________________________________________ Ooh, that second story was a good one. The movie Signs was the only thing that actually creeped me out a Oh, if only the Cthulhu story was just a little longer!!! The one South Park episode where the BP oil spill releases Cthulhu is probably the most screen time he's ever gotten, and I can't wait for him to get more. Lovecraft's original story is dismally short compared to my expectation. Still fantastic, though. The creepiness factor is still evident. ____________________________________________ Ooh, that second story was a good one. The movie Signs was the only thing that actually creeped me out as far as aliens go. This managed to do it. I was surprised to find that I actually felt unnerved. I finished reading this particular short story late one night. I looked up from my dimly lit Nook page, and though it wasn't such a big contrast between my screen and my living room, I felt a little uncomfortable being unable to see around me. It was so surprising that I had a momentary lapse and sort of laughed at myself for being afraid of the dark. I wonder what else is to come. _____________________________________________ The third story (I really should write the names down) has been my least favorite so far, and even then it's an awesome story. It's been a long, long time since I've been sufficiently frightened by the written word, and this managed to give me really harsh chills. See this quote: "Then, as I playfully shook him and turned him around, I felt the strangling tendrils of a cancerous horror whose roots reached into illimitable pasts and fathomless abysms of the night that broods beyond time. For Arthur Munroe was dead. And on what remained of his chewed and gouged head there was no longer a face...." _____________________________________________ "The Music of Erich Zann" A very short one that basically is an old man playing an instrument to keep a whilrwind demon thing at bay. My least favorite so far--perhaps because it was so short. ___________________________________________

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dawie

    Here are the stories in this volume: (*, Stories I count as among my favourites) The Call of Cthulhu* The Colour out of Space The Lurking Fear* The Music of Erich Zann* Dagon Pickman's Model The Dunwich Horror The Statement of Randolph Carter In the Vault Cool Air The Thing on the Doorstep The Dreams in the Witch House The Shadow over Innsmouth* At the Mountains of Madness* Herbert West-Reanimator The Rats in the Walls* The Case of Charles Dexter Ward The Whisperer In Darkness The Haunter of the Dark The Shadow out Here are the stories in this volume: (*, Stories I count as among my favourites) The Call of Cthulhu* The Colour out of Space The Lurking Fear* The Music of Erich Zann* Dagon Pickman's Model The Dunwich Horror The Statement of Randolph Carter In the Vault Cool Air The Thing on the Doorstep The Dreams in the Witch House The Shadow over Innsmouth* At the Mountains of Madness* Herbert West-Reanimator The Rats in the Walls* The Case of Charles Dexter Ward The Whisperer In Darkness The Haunter of the Dark The Shadow out of Time* If anyone would like to get to know H.P Lovcraft, this is the book I would borrow/recommend them. I would also recommend them not to try and read it from cover to cover, cuase it might get a overwhelming,( part of the reason I have taken so long to finish it.) The man was quite something in my opinion. If I had to review each and every story seperatly I am afraid that I would not do a very good task. Some stories are real good, some have boring, over elaborate parts, but in the end it all comes together in a way not many authors I know can acomplish. (Again, I do not know that many authors...) Lovecraft was I believe quite far ahead of his time. I will be re-reaing some of these stories again in the future.The stories are not so much "Horror" for me , but more suspense tales. I say this because the way he wrote most of the time when faced with a certain "Horror" the person in the storie would eithet loose his mind or faint or refer to it as Utter MADNESS! (I also understand this was H.P's way to leave it to the reader to interpret their own conclusions towards it.) It works on many occasions is all I am saying.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Gibson

    Wow, talk about overrated. Each short story has the exact same carbon copy protagonist and always follows the exact same setup; It's very boring, to say the least. There were a couple of ok stories at least, such as The Thing On The Doorstep, which is why I'm giving this two stars instead of just one. But overall these stories were just plain boring and repetitive. Worst of all, these short stories were supposed to be, at the very least, creepy, but this just did not do it for me. I suppose I ju Wow, talk about overrated. Each short story has the exact same carbon copy protagonist and always follows the exact same setup; It's very boring, to say the least. There were a couple of ok stories at least, such as The Thing On The Doorstep, which is why I'm giving this two stars instead of just one. But overall these stories were just plain boring and repetitive. Worst of all, these short stories were supposed to be, at the very least, creepy, but this just did not do it for me. I suppose I just don't find "big, scawy monstwers" to be at all frightening. I made it up to The Case of Charles Dexter Ward when I decided to put it aside.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    If you have never traveled in the world of H.P. Lovecraft then you owe it to yourself to explore. At the very least travel to Arkham, Massachusetts and visit Miskatonic University's library to read the Necronomicon. On a serious note, H.P. Lovecraft was gifted with the ability to paint vivid pictures and tell fanciful stories that truly ensnare the reader. While this collection is not an all encompassing one, it is a great way to dip one's toes into the dark waters that is H.P. Lovecraft's world.

  18. 5 out of 5

    James

    Darn! I thought I was going to really like this. The only trouble I've found is that the book is so difficult to follow sometimes as it was written almost a century ago. I love the stories but they are soooo confusing sometimes. Loved the Reanimator. My favorite by far. I would only reccomend it for someone who is really ready to lose some serious productivity.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kaitlyn (ktxx22) Walker

    This was magnificent! I have written individual reviews for each of the stories with in this collection. And as far as collections go this one comes highly recommended! Creepy, creative, and unlike anything I've ever read before or since.

  20. 3 out of 5

    Empty

    I came away with a great respect for the author. It is to the collection I give 4 stars, with difficulty.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Manny Perez

    I love love love Lovecraft!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Marie

    3.83 stars for the entire collection. Review to come.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Joel Lantz

    Certainly no easy read, it was well worth the effort. Nobody writes horror like this any more.

  24. 3 out of 5

    Richard Rogers

    H.P. Lovecraft has a particular way he likes to tell stories. A quaint way, I suppose. Rather than tell the story of an active hero who confronts his main conflict and either succeeds or fails in his efforts, he tells gives us second hand stories, with the action told out of order, and the conflict approached sideways. The author puts most of the action offstage, seen by reflection rather than by natural light. The heart of the action either takes place long, long ago, or it takes place in a hidd H.P. Lovecraft has a particular way he likes to tell stories. A quaint way, I suppose. Rather than tell the story of an active hero who confronts his main conflict and either succeeds or fails in his efforts, he tells gives us second hand stories, with the action told out of order, and the conflict approached sideways. The author puts most of the action offstage, seen by reflection rather than by natural light. The heart of the action either takes place long, long ago, or it takes place in a hidden way, behind closed doors, coming to light later. Most of the narration is rather like a police report, or a long diary entry explaining research that has taken years to collect. (Most of his stories are guilty of unnecessary detail and redundant action. I wondered again and again if it would have struck me in a different way 80 years ago, whether I would have relished what I often found dreary.) Rarely do his characters participate in the real story, with the major crisis occurring in real time; they usually are there to investigate what has already happened, to piece it together by hints and clues, more detective story than action story. The result is that the truly horrific or amazing or terrifying actions are only partly seen, only partly revealed, a bit at a time. They are glimpsed, and guessed at, and hidden from or run from, but rarely experienced by the narrator directly. (Some stories, like "The Thing on the Doorstep," and "The Shadow Over Innsmouth," feel more cinematic and more modern by having moments of true action, but they are the exception.) Sometimes ancient objects or alien relics are catalogued completely, blandly, scientifically, as in "At the Mountains of Madness," or "The Shadow out of Time," but at the same time with much fainting and upset all around, with key portions left out by the narrator because they are too terrifying to reveal. Lovecraft's strategy is to make the strange and exotic remain somewhat veiled, only partly seen, protecting it from the sanitizing light of first person experience. He feared making his cosmic or supernatural creatures too familiar, robbing them of their impact. In the same way that movie monsters are more frightening before they are revealed, his horrors are usually kept away from our close scrutiny, with details hinted at but left unsaid. 80 and 90 years after they were written, after decades of science fiction and horror in books and movies dealing with similar themes, our reaction is doubtless much different from that of the original audience. For Lovecraft, the essence of horror is realizing the cold truth revealed by science, by Darwin and astronomers and archaeologists and physicists: that humans are not the only creatures in the universe, or even the original creatures of earth, and that our assumption that we were a special creation, one that is watched over by a loving creator, is nothing but a comforting myth. It is realizing that almost the entire history of life preceded our own, and we are not central to the story of the universe. We are, in fact, minor characters, or nearly invisible and inconsequential props, overshadowed by greater, wiser, more powerful, less comprehensible others. Lovecraft's fiction uses scale to dethrone humanity, to reduce us to insignificance--galactic distances, deep time measure in eons, unfathomable intelligences without compassion or even sanity--awakening his reader to the notion that humans and human history are vanishingly small and unimportant and fragile and impermanent in a universe that doesn't need us and doesn't care whether we exist another instant. He takes us, thematically, into a terrifying, giant room off our house that we never knew existed. Then, as we are adjusting to this new reality, he shows us a door to a room off that one which dwarfs the first--and then hints at a terrifying door at the end of that room leading to something greater and more incomprehensible and soul-shattering than anything so far. After that, disoriented, mind blown, he brings us back to small town America to emphasize how our secure and pleasant existence is an illusion. He feeds the fear that perhaps there are malevolent actors, titanic and remorseless, who would gladly squish us if we foolishly succeeded in getting their attention. Over and over in the stories, his characters are like Jack, too curious for their own good, tapping the giant on the shoulder, wondering what happens next. Usually, the squishing comes next. Thematically speaking. Lovecraft would very much like us to quit trying to wake the giant.

  25. 3 out of 5

    Mary Ozbolt

    I mean I only read one story but whatever

  26. 5 out of 5

    Your Common House Bat

    Okay so I didn't actually finish this one but only because I had borrowed it from a friend and he finally wanted it back lol. But I really really did like what I managed to get through. I really loved Dunwhich and the Colour of Space. In general I loved the eerie feel to the whole collection. And his less-is-more type horror intrigued me especially in an age where outright gore is relied on. I ended up typing a few mini-reviews for some of the stories. Call of Cthulhu I have been meaning to read t Okay so I didn't actually finish this one but only because I had borrowed it from a friend and he finally wanted it back lol. But I really really did like what I managed to get through. I really loved Dunwhich and the Colour of Space. In general I loved the eerie feel to the whole collection. And his less-is-more type horror intrigued me especially in an age where outright gore is relied on. I ended up typing a few mini-reviews for some of the stories. Call of Cthulhu I have been meaning to read this story for a long time. Not gonna lie, mostly because of the Narwhal song. But also because I really love the horror genre and I’ve only heard good things about Lovecraft. Needless to say I wasn’t disappointed. He managed to write story that left so much to mystery that it was unsettling. It wasn’t scary or even creepy it was just eerie. And I think that that’s the best kind of horror. Especially when it’s ended on a note that brings you into the story in a sense….that applies it to you as a reader and almost brings you a real sense of danger. The Colour of Space The Colour of Space was more intriguing to me than Cthulhu though. This one was just even more disturbing. The imagery was on point and very chilling. The descriptions of the family slowly going mad. That thing in the well almost made Samara from The Ring a joke. I really liked reading about the comet and its weird colors and otherworldly ability to always stay heated. The Lurking Fear This story didn’t really catch my attention as much as the other two. It was alright and it had its moments (like I loved the stormy weather—gonna have to pick it back up during a storm and the part where the guy is killed by the window) but it was really just meh for me. The Music of Erich Zann The title of this one drew my attention immediately. I was almost gonna skip to it but decided to just read the book in order. And I did end up really liking this one. It was very interesting the way Lovecraft was able to spin a terror using music as the core focal point. His descriptions of the mad Erich playing his viola were amazing. Dagon This one reminded me a lot of Cthulhu but shorter. It was an alright story. The stranded at sea theme is always interesting to see put into work. And Lovecraft did it masterfully. Pickman’s Model I also really liked this one. It was very creative especially in the way that he described the paintings “that’s because the real artist knows the actual anatomy of the terrible or the physiology of fear, the exact sort of lines and proportions that connect with latent instincts or hereditary fears.” I just really loved this line. Dunwhich Similarly to how I was drawn into Cthulhu, I was drawn into this story because there’s this band called Dunwhich that I really like. La Casa dell'Alchimista is an amazing song, I recommend it. And the album cover is my basis for visualizing the altar created by Lovecraft. This is one of my favorite Lovecraft stories (next to Colour of Space) the descriptions of the town and forest were neat. And the mysterious odor and substance were intriguing as well. I also enjoyed the character of Wilbur. The Statement Of Randolph Carter This is another very eerie and mysterious one that I enjoyed. It was so simple and to the point and left so much to mystery that it was enjoyable. In The Vault I think this one is my second favorite Lovecraft story, next to Colour of Space. I just thought it had a neat setting; I enjoy the classically spooky grave yard setting. And the idea of a clumsy, uncaring undertaker trapped with the bodies drew me in. Cool Air Cool Air was another good one. It started out slow for me, but by the time ‘the horror’ struck I was intrigued. The whole body preservation concept just sent chills down my spine, especially since the man was a walking cdaver .

  27. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

    I read this collection of tales one by one over the course of the last few months; usually one short story each night before bed. Despite my personal enjoyment of Lovecraft's lasting influence on the horror genre as a whole, I do feel obligated to be truthful about what others can expect from his work. Frankly, if you have read one Lovecraft tale, then you have read them all. There is little to no variation in the core makeup of each and every single story. There never fails to be a male scholar I read this collection of tales one by one over the course of the last few months; usually one short story each night before bed. Despite my personal enjoyment of Lovecraft's lasting influence on the horror genre as a whole, I do feel obligated to be truthful about what others can expect from his work. Frankly, if you have read one Lovecraft tale, then you have read them all. There is little to no variation in the core makeup of each and every single story. There never fails to be a male scholar with varying forms of knowledge of the occult and the Necronomicon. This character is often driven by a curiosity and thirst for knowledge of the unknown that leads to confronting whatever horror or atrocity is being conjured up in that particular story. Of course, a direct description about such horror is too much to ask for because Lovecraft must first reiterate numerous times that what he is about to say is absolutely "unspeakable" and provides some reason why he has not revealed what he is about to say before now. The settings do change occasionally, but they all share certain characteristics: locals with knowledge and belief in myths or legends that inevitably end up based in fact about the area, one or two particularly strange citizens who are just brave enough to talk to our main character and ignite or encourage the endless curiosity, the subtle not-quite-right feeling of rural areas or being surrounded by ruins of buildings centuries old. Because of this lack of variation, it becomes very easy to predict where the stories will eventually end up in some capacity or other. Some of the reiterations made throughout the tales may have been the result of having the story published in separate parts in publications such as Weird Tales, which would make the constant restatement of events useful at the time instead of tedious as they are for those of us who have the complete stories to read at our leisure. I enjoyed reading the collection because I had a previous appreciation for Lovecraft's influence on a genre I love, but I think if I had been exposed to Lovecraft beforehand and on his own merit that I would find his work boring and not nearly as deserving of praise as some people feel that it is.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Clifford Quattlander

    It took me way too long to go through all twenty stories in this collection, but what an introduction to Lovecraft! A blend of horror, fantasy and science fiction, Lovecraft weaves tales of horror as men come across truths that threaten to shatter mankind's collective sanity. Some of the science is dated, and Lovecraft's prejudices leak through, but it's still an impressive collection of stories, many of which deal with the "Cthulu Mythos".

  29. 3 out of 5

    Bob Zyla

    Upon now finishing The Shadow Out of Time, I've finally completed my Odyssey of Lovecraft's original fiction. (This does not include the revisions in The Horror in the Museum, which I believe contain several Mythos stories.) This was a titanic story, really just awe-inspiring in scope, and I'm glad I kept it for last. It may not be a popular opinion but I think it was a better told tale than AtMoM. I bought this pretty collection because it contains most of what I was missing in my lost Del Rey Upon now finishing The Shadow Out of Time, I've finally completed my Odyssey of Lovecraft's original fiction. (This does not include the revisions in The Horror in the Museum, which I believe contain several Mythos stories.) This was a titanic story, really just awe-inspiring in scope, and I'm glad I kept it for last. It may not be a popular opinion but I think it was a better told tale than AtMoM. I bought this pretty collection because it contains most of what I was missing in my lost Del Rey edition "The Best of HPL". Its insane for me to play favorites with his stories. I caught the bug and am enamored by it all. But if I was forced to choose just one, I may go with The Shadow Over Innsmouth. Onward henceforth to the revisions and the other Mythos stories of the first generation of the Lovecraft circle!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bob Wolniak

    I actually read this book on and off again over quite a long while though I'm just posting now. I find that I can only take so much of Lovecraft at one time without becoming unnerved! I like the shorter stories that don't get so repetitively wordy, but my oh my did this guy have an imagination! It makes sense to me he was good friends with Robert E. Howard and wrote extensively for Weird Tales and other such magazines. These pulp tales and novellas mostly have a similar style of an academic type I actually read this book on and off again over quite a long while though I'm just posting now. I find that I can only take so much of Lovecraft at one time without becoming unnerved! I like the shorter stories that don't get so repetitively wordy, but my oh my did this guy have an imagination! It makes sense to me he was good friends with Robert E. Howard and wrote extensively for Weird Tales and other such magazines. These pulp tales and novellas mostly have a similar style of an academic type narrator confronting horror and having some sort of shock or twist by the end. In this sense, Lovecraft presaged Twilight Zone and so many other TV shows and modern authors. He is greatly influential in creating a whole universe Cthulhu mythos etc.

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